A Few Red Drops Dinah Stevenson at Clarion has acquired world English rights to A Few Red Drops a YA nonfiction title by Claire Hartfield The book tells the story of the Chicago Race Riots of and how the buildi

  • Title: A Few Red Drops
  • Author: Claire Hartfield
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 245
  • Format: None
  • Dinah Stevenson at Clarion has acquired world English rights to A Few Red Drops, a YA nonfiction title by Claire Hartfield The book tells the story of the Chicago Race Riots of 1919 and how the building tensions and conflicting interests exploded in bloodshed that sent shock waves across the nation It s slated for 2017 publication Rosemary Stimola of Stimola Literary StDinah Stevenson at Clarion has acquired world English rights to A Few Red Drops, a YA nonfiction title by Claire Hartfield The book tells the story of the Chicago Race Riots of 1919 and how the building tensions and conflicting interests exploded in bloodshed that sent shock waves across the nation It s slated for 2017 publication Rosemary Stimola of Stimola Literary Studio did the deal.

    • ↠ A Few Red Drops || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Claire Hartfield
      245 Claire Hartfield
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      Posted by:Claire Hartfield
      Published :2018-07-18T05:32:13+00:00

    One Reply to “A Few Red Drops”

    1. A few boys drift too far outside the racially-designated beach at Lake Michigan one summer and trouble ensues. A boy dies and rumors fly and it is soon black against white and white against black. Many die as the destruction goes on for days, fed by lies subtly shared by standing city gangs and by those who profit most from conflict. It's a dark story of people against people as pressures increase in the city after the war for jobs, for housing. It's a cautionary tale for today as well, with lie [...]

    2. Although titled The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, most of this book focuses on building the background of what led to these riots: building tensions between blacks, white Protestants, and Irish immigrants. The division between blacks and whites, rich and poor, American-born and immigrants became deeper by the day in Chicago. Finally, on an unseasonably hot September day, a group of four black teenage boys was attacked by a white teen throwing rocks as they were swimming and rafting on Lake Michigan [...]

    3. *** I received an e galley from Netgalley in return for an honest review.***I do not read much nonfiction, but I was interested in the topic having read The Hate U Give and All-American Boys. I agree with other readers that most of the book discusses the issues and the history of Chicago leading up to the riots and little on the riots themselves. I thought it was a good read and would make a good pairing with the books previously mentioned.

    4. A quick, interesting and enjoyable read. A Few Red Drops spends the majority of it's time not on the riot itself, but in setting up the context for why such a deadly riot occurred. By building up the history of Chicago at the time, and how the great migration, WWI and Unionizing efforts in Chicago Meat Packing industry stoked tensions along racial and ethnic lines, A Few Red Drops gives a much fuller picture of the 1919 riot. Solid rec.

    5. Informative and important, but the narrative didn't really grab me. Heavy on background (Great Migration, Eastern/Central European immigration to the United States in the early 19th century) to the extent that the book feels mistitled. Will re-read.

    6. The books was interesting. In college, I took a class on the rise of unions in Chicago and how it impacted tensions between the different ethnic groups, but I have never heard about the Chicago Race Riot of 1919. I loved all of the pictures taken of important figures in history, of the actual riots, the locations of the beaches, homes and work places and I loved how their were historical documents too. The story was interesting where it started with the actual event then went back and showed how [...]

    7. “A Few Red Drops” is a fascinating overview and history of the Chicago race riot of 1919, but is also a fairly comprehensive study of social and racial matters in the US and the connection between economics and strife. The book is beautifully laid out and rich in history, containing numerous photos, maps, and other visual aids.Hartfield makes clear the plight of the immigrants, both Black and European, and the desperation of so many, but she also plainly calls out the greed and cruelty of ot [...]

    8. Author Claire Hartfield provides the background and history of the Chicago Race Riot of 1919, detailing not only what happened at the time, but all the events that led up to the riot. The narrative is detailed in its explanation of this explosive time period in our American history. Many photographs are scattered throughout the text that illustrate this time period. The author includes a copy of the poem, "I Am the People, The Mob," by Carl Sandburg (which is quoted some in the text), a detailed [...]

    9. I received this book as an ARC. As other readers have stated, this book isn't only about the Chicago Race Riot of 1919. Over half the book is dedicated to Chicago immigrant history and race relations in the 19th and 20th centuries. The title would more appropriately be something along the lines of "Chicago Race Relations." It was a quick read with a lot of great historical photographs of Chicago landmarks and people; it was only lacking a map of Chicago and all the neighborhoods that were discus [...]

    10. Informative, but a little dry.The first half of the book is mostly dedicated to immigration and setting up Chicago's variety of ethnicities. This is important to set up the riots of 1919, but perhaps too much time was spent on this aspect.Once we get to the riots, we get plenty of information. However, I easily could see this done as narrative non-fiction in a more intriguing way that might truly get to a YA reader. I also would have liked more of a connection to today's issues, or some grander [...]

    11. A sad and maddening in-depth look at the lead up to the race riot in Chicago of 1919. Sadly, many of the same issues are still relevant today (eg, police mistreatment of blacks, racial prejudice, mistrust of immigrants, ignorance of our veterans, and a wide income disparity). A white friend wanted to know why blacks had race riots. This was a white riot, with white gangs killing blacks with impunity, and a few blacks retaliating but bearing a heavy price.

    12. This easy read outlines all of the events leading up to and then of course the horrific details of the July 1919 Race Riot in Chicago. Martin Luther King Jr. said "A riot is the language of the unheard." "A Few Drops" focuses on the Stockyard, the burgeoning labor unions, Eastern European immigration, and the great migration and the effects of housing discrimination as a formula for disaster.

    13. I wanted to like this, but it was such a struggle to get through. The content and topic were great, super intense and very informative, but oh man this was such a dry read. Even as someone who reads nonfiction regularly it read like a textbook which is why it took me so long to get through. Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC.

    14. Fascinating teen nonfiction book about the Chicago Race Riot of 1919 and the racial segregation leading up to the events. Contains a wealth of photographs. Teens interested in history and social justice will enjoy this.

    15. A thorough telling of Chicago's race riots in 1919. A reveal of how little we have traveled forward.

    16. Conflicts don't emerge from thin air--this nicely portrays the background that led to the Chicago race riots of 1919

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