Women in Chains The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women s Fiction Using writers such as Harriet Wilson Frances E W Harper Pauline Hopkins Toni Morrison Sherley Anne Williams and Gayl Jones the author highlights recurring themes and the various responses of bla

  • Title: Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women's Fiction
  • Author: Venetria K. Patton
  • ISBN: 9780791443439
  • Page: 107
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Using writers such as Harriet Wilson, Frances E W Harper, Pauline Hopkins, Toni Morrison, Sherley Anne Williams, and Gayl Jones, the author highlights recurring themes and the various responses of black women writers to the issues of race and gender Time and again these writers link slavery with motherhood their depictions of black womanhood are tied to the effects ofUsing writers such as Harriet Wilson, Frances E W Harper, Pauline Hopkins, Toni Morrison, Sherley Anne Williams, and Gayl Jones, the author highlights recurring themes and the various responses of black women writers to the issues of race and gender Time and again these writers link slavery with motherhood their depictions of black womanhood are tied to the effects of slavery and represented through the black mother Patton shows that both the image others have of black women as well as black women s own self image is framed and influenced by the history of slavery This history would have us believe that female slaves were mere breeders and not mothers However, Patton uses the mother figure as a tool to create an intriguing interdisciplinary literary analysis.

    • Unlimited [Thriller Book] ☆ Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women's Fiction - by Venetria K. Patton ✓
      107 Venetria K. Patton
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Thriller Book] ☆ Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women's Fiction - by Venetria K. Patton ✓
      Posted by:Venetria K. Patton
      Published :2018-05-15T13:58:52+00:00

    One Reply to “Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women's Fiction”

    1. A very interesting read to be sure. Although, I am mistified as to how the author can make the assuration that some slave women and white slaveowners could have a sexual relationship? Other fictional stories have a similar situation. In Venetria K. Patterson's she uses ample examples in literature and reality where this is impossible. The slaveowners feel lust for a female slave and she feels horror for him. It is inconceivable to me how a black woman could feel love or affection for a man that [...]

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