Nuthin But a G Thang The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap In the late s gangsta rap music emerged in urban America giving voice to and making money for a social group widely considered to be in crisis young poor black men From its local origins gang

  • Title: Nuthin' But a "G" Thang: The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap
  • Author: Eithne Quinn
  • ISBN: 9780231124096
  • Page: 309
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the late 1980s, gangsta rap music emerged in urban America, giving voice to and making money for a social group widely considered to be in crisis young, poor, black men From its local origins, gangsta rap went on to flood the mainstream, generating enormous popularity and profits Yet the highly charged lyrics, public battles, and hard, fast lifestyles that characteIn the late 1980s, gangsta rap music emerged in urban America, giving voice to and making money for a social group widely considered to be in crisis young, poor, black men From its local origins, gangsta rap went on to flood the mainstream, generating enormous popularity and profits Yet the highly charged lyrics, public battles, and hard, fast lifestyles that characterize the genre have incited the anger of many public figures and proponents of family values Constantly engaging questions of black identity and race relations, poverty and wealth, gangsta rap represents one of the most profound influences on pop culture in the last thirty years.Focusing on the artists Ice Cube, Dr Dre, the Geto Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Tupac Shakur, Quinn explores the origins, development, and immense appeal of gangsta rap Including detailed readings in urban geography, neoconservative politics, subcultural formations, black cultural debates, and music industry conditions, this book explains how and why this music genre emerged In Nuthin but a G Thang, Quinn argues that gangsta rap both reflected and reinforced the decline in black protest culture and the great rise in individualist and entrepreneurial thinking that took place in the U.S after the 1970s Uncovering gangsta rap s deep roots in black working class expressive culture, she stresses the music s aesthetic pleasures and complexities that have often been ignored in critical accounts.

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      309 Eithne Quinn
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      Posted by:Eithne Quinn
      Published :2018-09-04T04:14:02+00:00

    One Reply to “Nuthin' But a "G" Thang: The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap”

    1. This book is useful to trace the beginnings of gangsta rap into mainstream America through the commercialization of its most prominent rappers, notably Ice Cube. Quinn also delves into a generating force behind the development of gangsta rap as an enterprise: the shift from American industrialization, which left many ghetto peoples poor and unemployed, the government abandonment of local community organizations for its minority--particularly black youth--which left young rap pioneers such as Dr. [...]

    2. Though (Black) women, misogyny, and female rappers weren't explored in nearly half as much detail as males; though the author makes this salacious claim that made me PAUSE: "Since gangsta lyrics are centrally preoccupied with dramatizing power relations, I would argue that the opposite sex is implicitly – and often explicitly – construed as powerful in gangsta rap. The “hard man” strikes out at anything that threatens his ego or stature. If romantic partners possessed no power to injure [...]

    3. Well, it's interesting a point. After reading it, I definitely know more than I started with about Gangsta rap, though I didn't get as much as I'd hoped out of the book. I felt like the multiethnic history of rap and hip hop was glossed over and the black versus white attitude emphasized too much.

    4. A really great examination of gangsta rap culture, and its rise to prominence. The book is very sociological though. The author uses a lot of huge words, almost to prove she can use big words. Besides having to reread numerous passages, trying to figure out what they hell she was getting at, it was a very informative book.

    5. I've been reading a ton about hip hop lately, and this book was super fun and satisfying. The chapters on 'bad man lore' and 'tricksters' were especially tasty.

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